Feedly For iPhone X

We have been using the iPhone X for two weeks and have found the fluidity of the touch-based interface and the beauty of the new OLED screen very inspiring. We just pushed out a new version of Feedly that takes advantage of these new features and more. We hope that you will enjoy using it as much as we enjoyed building it.

New Layout

The new Feedly app is optimized for the iconic iPhone notch and respects the bottom home area.

New iPhone X Layout

New OLED-Friendly Black Theme

The iPhone X comes with an incredible OLED display. We transformed the Feedly dark team to pure black, creating a sharper and more energy efficient experience.

OLED-Friendly Pure Black Theme

Seamless Buffer Integration

Lots of Feedly Pro users use the content they discover in Feedly to mold their digital identity and showcase their expertise on Social Media. Buffer makes sharing on LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and other networks easier and more efficient. In this new version of Feedly, we have optimized the user experience for Feedly+Buffer users. In one click, you can jump from reading an article in Feedly to sharing that article in the Buffer app.

Thank you to Andy and the Buffer team for their collaboration on this joint project!

1-Click Buffer Integration

Polish, Polish, Polish…

  • Upgraded the Twitter and Facebook integrations so that you can easily share articles you find interesting
  • Improved the Google News keyword alert integration
  • Enhanced the source discovery experience
  • Fixed iPad share selection crash
  • Fixed iOS 11 save image crash

Available in the App Store (free)

 

 

 

Design Review: The New Organize Experience

Update: We launched the new organize experience! Read the announcement here.

At Feedly we’re focused on simplifying how you consume information every day. We help you find and connect to all the sources you need. The next step is giving you a simple, effective way to organize your sources by topic, project, industry, client, or passion.

Being able to re-organize these sources as your needs evolve is a critical part of controlling the signal-to-noise ratio in your Feedly. One of our goals for 2017 is to make re-organizing sources easier, faster, and more data-driven.

We started this journey by reaching out to the community and listening to your feedback. Thank you to the 27,000+ people who participated in the Organize survey by telling us how we could improve the experience. Here are some of the most popular requests from the survey:

  • Visibility into broken sources and publishing frequency
  • Ability to sort and filter feeds
  • Show personal reading statistics
  • Editing single sources and bulk operations to move or unfollow sources

00 — Design Direction

Based on the survey data, we decided to center the new organize experience on 3 features:

  1. Show a bird’s-eye view of your sources using filters for source activity (active, inactive, or unreachable) in a specific feed or by searching for a source by name
  2. Surface metadata about how useful each source has been to you recently. In the first version we’re focusing on the number of articles per month and how many of those you have read
  3. Make it easy to act on this metadata: select multiple sources and move or unfollow them

01 — Filter sources

During our research we found that on average most of you follow about 75 sources organized into 10 feeds. At the same time some users have 20,000 sources and more than 200 feeds.


One of our challenges was finding a way to enable you to manage a large number of sources as easily as just a few. We decided on an table-like interface with a list of all your sources along with some reading statistics. This list, combined with a powerful filter, should solve two big needs expressed in your survey responses: 1) to find sources that are either unreachable or too noisy, and 2) to see which of your feeds the source belongs to.

We also created some shortcuts for the most-used operations like finding unreachable or inactive sources.

In the new user interface, you can filter sources by activity and by the feeds they belong to.

02 — Reading Statistics and Source Status

The ultimate goal of the new organize UI is to help you optimize your signal-to-noise ratio. By reviewing your personal reading statistics, you can make informed decisions about the sources you follow. You will see 2 metrics to keep things simple: how often sources are updated, and how many of those updates you read.

We believe these metrics are correlated. If the feed is getting hundreds of new articles and you’re reading just a few of them, this is a good indication of where the “noise” is coming from.

03 — Batch Operations

Now that you know where most of your content is coming from and how you consume it, the next step is to take action. Our gut feeling (validated by the survey data) is that the most important actions are re-organizing your sources and feeds and unfollowing inactive or unreachable sources.

In the new Organize experience, it’s easy to move multiple sources at once. You can also group sources into multiple feeds. Lastly, you can unfollow multiple sources at once by selecting them and clicking “Unfollow.”

Next Steps

Soon we will push these changes to everyone who signed up for early access. After the early-access period ends, we will activate the new Organize experience for all Feedly users. In the meantime, we would love to hear your feedback on this new design.

Please leave us a comment below — we’ll write you back.

Stay tuned!

Design Review: The New Organize Experience

Update: We launched the new organize experience! Read the announcement here.

At Feedly we’re focused on simplifying how you consume information every day. We help you find and connect to all the sources you need. The next step is giving you a simple, effective way to organize your sources by topic, project, industry, client, or passion.

Being able to re-organize these sources as your needs evolve is a critical part of controlling the signal-to-noise ratio in your Feedly. One of our goals for 2017 is to make re-organizing sources easier, faster, and more data-driven.

We started this journey by reaching out to the community and listening to your feedback. Thank you to the 27,000+ people who participated in the Organize survey by telling us how we could improve the experience. Here are some of the most popular requests from the survey:

  • Visibility into broken sources and publishing frequency
  • Ability to sort and filter feeds
  • Show personal reading statistics
  • Editing single sources and bulk operations to move or unfollow sources

00 — Design Direction

Based on the survey data, we decided to center the new organize experience on 3 features:

  1. Show a bird’s-eye view of your sources using filters for source activity (active, inactive, or unreachable) in a specific feed or by searching for a source by name
  2. Surface metadata about how useful each source has been to you recently. In the first version we’re focusing on the number of articles per month and how many of those you have read
  3. Make it easy to act on this metadata: select multiple sources and move or unfollow them

01 — Filter sources

During our research we found that on average most of you follow about 75 sources organized into 10 feeds. At the same time some users have 20,000 sources and more than 200 feeds.


One of our challenges was finding a way to enable you to manage a large number of sources as easily as just a few. We decided on an table-like interface with a list of all your sources along with some reading statistics. This list, combined with a powerful filter, should solve two big needs expressed in your survey responses: 1) to find sources that are either unreachable or too noisy, and 2) to see which of your feeds the source belongs to.

We also created some shortcuts for the most-used operations like finding unreachable or inactive sources.

In the new user interface, you can filter sources by activity and by the feeds they belong to.

02 — Reading Statistics and Source Status

The ultimate goal of the new organize UI is to help you optimize your signal-to-noise ratio. By reviewing your personal reading statistics, you can make informed decisions about the sources you follow. You will see 2 metrics to keep things simple: how often sources are updated, and how many of those updates you read.

We believe these metrics are correlated. If the feed is getting hundreds of new articles and you’re reading just a few of them, this is a good indication of where the “noise” is coming from.

03 — Batch Operations

Now that you know where most of your content is coming from and how you consume it, the next step is to take action. Our gut feeling (validated by the survey data) is that the most important actions are re-organizing your sources and feeds and unfollowing inactive or unreachable sources.

In the new Organize experience, it’s easy to move multiple sources at once. You can also group sources into multiple feeds. Lastly, you can unfollow multiple sources at once by selecting them and clicking “Unfollow.”

Next Steps

Soon we will push these changes to everyone who signed up for early access. After the early-access period ends, we will activate the new Organize experience for all Feedly users. In the meantime, we would love to hear your feedback on this new design.

Please leave us a comment below — we’ll write you back.

Stay tuned!

Introducing Boards, Notes, and Highlights

Feedly is home to a vibrant community of experts, students, and trailblazers. We all have our own reasons for reading what we do. Maybe you want to gain a deeper understanding of a topic, or discover something new.

Whatever your motivation, the power of information lies in your ability to harness it. Today we are sharing three new features we hope will make your Feedly experience even better: Boards, notes, and highlights.

Keep reading for a step-by-step guide to using Boards. Or watch this replay of a live demo announcing Boards:

 

With our vibrant community in mind, we set out to build new features that would make it easier and more meaningful to read in Feedly.

As you save more articles, your Boards become libraries of high-value content. Everyone can create new Personal Boards. Feedly Teams users will see separate lists in the left navigation for Personal and Team Boards.

Feedly is turning its reader into a powerful knowledge board creation tool Sarah Perez, TechCrunch (@sarahintampa)

How to Save an Article to a Board

Boards are for saving and organizing articles. All Feedly plans (Basic, Pro, and Teams) can save articles.

Click on the star   on any article to save it. If this is your first time using Boards, we will ask you to create one.

When it comes to naming your Boards, try to keep a singular focus. This will keep you organized by your specific projects, clients, brands you monitor, or other important tasks.

Save a single article to multiple Boards. In the example above, a piece about marketing tactics is saved to both the “Marketing & Growth” and “Social Media” Boards.

Want to get started right now? Here are 8 ways to use Boards to streamline your curation process.

Adding Notes & Highlights

Imagine you’re reading and a phrase sparks an idea about a client or a business opportunity. Feedly Pro and Teams users can enrich articles using notes and highlights.

If you are part of a Feedly Teams plan, your teammates will be able to read your notes and add their own.

Here’s a step-by-step guide to adding notes without missing a beat.

Your note appears at the top of the article, where you can edit it or add another note right below it.

Highlight the most important passages to make it easy for your colleagues and other executives to scan. Since articles saved to Boards never expire, you’ll be able to revisit these notes and highlights in the future.

Shared Team Boards

We’ve seen that active knowledge sharing can drive tons of value for your team. By creating shared Team Boards, you have a central place to store those gems you find and see what your teammates have saved.

Say goodbye to clunky email chains and spreadsheets. With Team Boards you have the additional option of sending email roundups to teammates as well as executives outside your team and even external clients. Read more about the benefits of Feedly Teams.

To help you get started, we reviewed the Boards of some of the smartest industry analysts, researchers, and marketers. Here are some of their best practices that might inspire you: 7 Great Board Examples.

Turn your Team Boards into newsletters. It’s a great way to keep up with fast-changing industry trends as a team.

Save From Anywhere

Easily switch between devices. The Feedly mobile apps (for iPhone or Android) keep your content synced in real time.

You can save content while browsing the web on desktop or mobile. Add the Feedly browser extension for Chrome, Firefox, and Safari, and you can save any article in just two clicks. When you go back to your Boards on Feedly, the article will be right where you saved it.

This Medium post is now saved to my “Entrepreneurship” Board in Feedly.

Now it’s your turn…

What Will You Save?

FAQs

Q: How do I get my team started on Feedly?

Start a one-month free trial and invite as many teammates as you like. With Boards, you and your team can stay ahead of changes in your market, move faster than competitors, and plug knowledge gaps in your organization. We’re happy to work with your team through the one-month free trial and beyond.

Among the team here at Feedly, we use Boards every day to track mentions of our brand and share articles on topics such as machine learning, sales, and company culture.

Q: Can I save to Boards on my phone?

Yes. You can read, save, and share on mobile and desktop. If you’re reading on the Feedly mobile app, tap the   icon to save. You’ll be able to save the current article to one or more of your Personal and Team Boards.

Don’t forget there are 5 easy ways to save to Boards!

Q: Can I add notes and highlights on my phone?

Yes, Feedly Pro and Teams users can use all the same features on mobile.

Q: Can I keep using Read Later?

Yes. Read Later is still there. You can save articles to Boards and Read Later for an even more customized Feedly.

Q: How are Boards different from tags?

We heard from users that it would be useful to be able to privately share content with teammates. Boards felt more like a central hub with shared access to allow for team curation. Tags didn’t meet the needs communicated to us by the Feedly community. Given that this is an area where we are going to invest a lot, we decided to change the terminology to have the right foundation in place.

If you were using tags, all of your tags and the content associated with them are available as private personal Boards.

Q: How do I rename a Board?

When you are looking at one of your Boards, click on the […] button and go to Settings. There you can change the Board name.

Q: How many Boards can I create?

Feedly Pro and Teams accounts have unlimited Boards. Basic accounts can create up to 3 Boards. Feedly is proud to be supported by subscriptions to our premium feature set. Compare the different features here.

Q: Is there a tutorial for adding notes and highlights?

Yes, here is a step-by-step guide to adding notes. And you can see how to create highlights here.

Introducing Boards, Notes, and Highlights

Feedly is home to a vibrant community of experts, students, and trailblazers. We all have our own reasons for reading what we do. Maybe you want to gain a deeper understanding of a topic, or discover something new.

Whatever your motivation, the power of information lies in your ability to harness it. Today we are sharing three new features we hope will make your Feedly experience even better: Boards, notes, and highlights.

Keep reading for a step-by-step guide to using Boards. Or watch this replay of a live demo announcing Boards:

 

With our vibrant community in mind, we set out to build new features that would make it easier and more meaningful to read in Feedly.

As you save more articles, your Boards become libraries of high-value content. Everyone can create new Personal Boards. Feedly Teams users will see separate lists in the left navigation for Personal and Team Boards.

Feedly is turning its reader into a powerful knowledge board creation tool Sarah Perez, TechCrunch (@sarahintampa)

How to Save an Article to a Board

Boards are for saving and organizing articles. All Feedly plans (Basic, Pro, and Teams) can save articles.

Click on the star   on any article to save it. If this is your first time using Boards, we will ask you to create one.

When it comes to naming your Boards, try to keep a singular focus. This will keep you organized by your specific projects, clients, brands you monitor, or other important tasks.

Save a single article to multiple Boards. In the example above, a piece about marketing tactics is saved to both the “Marketing & Growth” and “Social Media” Boards.

Want to get started right now? Here are 8 ways to use Boards to streamline your curation process.

Adding Notes & Highlights

Imagine you’re reading and a phrase sparks an idea about a client or a business opportunity. Feedly Pro and Teams users can enrich articles using notes and highlights.

If you are part of a Feedly Teams plan, your teammates will be able to read your notes and add their own.

Here’s a step-by-step guide to adding notes without missing a beat.

Your note appears at the top of the article, where you can edit it or add another note right below it.

Highlight the most important passages to make it easy for your colleagues and other executives to scan. Since articles saved to Boards never expire, you’ll be able to revisit these notes and highlights in the future.

Shared Team Boards

We’ve seen that active knowledge sharing can drive tons of value for your team. By creating shared Team Boards, you have a central place to store those gems you find and see what your teammates have saved.

Say goodbye to clunky email chains and spreadsheets. With Team Boards you have the additional option of sending email roundups to teammates as well as executives outside your team and even external clients. Read more about the benefits of Feedly Teams.

To help you get started, we reviewed the Boards of some of the smartest industry analysts, researchers, and marketers. Here are some of their best practices that might inspire you: 7 Great Board Examples.

Turn your Team Boards into newsletters. It’s a great way to keep up with fast-changing industry trends as a team.

Save From Anywhere

Easily switch between devices. The Feedly mobile apps (for iPhone or Android) keep your content synced in real time.

You can save content while browsing the web on desktop or mobile. Add the Feedly browser extension for Chrome, Firefox, and Safari, and you can save any article in just two clicks. When you go back to your Boards on Feedly, the article will be right where you saved it.

This Medium post is now saved to my “Entrepreneurship” Board in Feedly.

Now it’s your turn…

What Will You Save?

FAQs

Q: How do I get my team started on Feedly?

Start a one-month free trial and invite as many teammates as you like. With Boards, you and your team can stay ahead of changes in your market, move faster than competitors, and plug knowledge gaps in your organization. We’re happy to work with your team through the one-month free trial and beyond.

Among the team here at Feedly, we use Boards every day to track mentions of our brand and share articles on topics such as machine learning, sales, and company culture.

Q: Can I save to Boards on my phone?

Yes. You can read, save, and share on mobile and desktop. If you’re reading on the Feedly mobile app, tap the   icon to save. You’ll be able to save the current article to one or more of your Personal and Team Boards.

Don’t forget there are 5 easy ways to save to Boards!

Q: Can I add notes and highlights on my phone?

Yes, Feedly Pro and Teams users can use all the same features on mobile.

Q: Can I keep using Read Later?

Yes. Read Later is still there. You can save articles to Boards and Read Later for an even more customized Feedly.

Q: How are Boards different from tags?

We heard from users that it would be useful to be able to privately share content with teammates. Boards felt more like a central hub with shared access to allow for team curation. Tags didn’t meet the needs communicated to us by the Feedly community. Given that this is an area where we are going to invest a lot, we decided to change the terminology to have the right foundation in place.

If you were using tags, all of your tags and the content associated with them are available as private personal Boards.

Q: How do I rename a Board?

When you are looking at one of your Boards, click on the […] button and go to Settings. There you can change the Board name.

Q: How many Boards can I create?

Feedly Pro and Teams accounts have unlimited Boards. Basic accounts can create up to 3 Boards. Feedly is proud to be supported by subscriptions to our premium feature set. Compare the different features here.

Q: Is there a tutorial for adding notes and highlights?

Yes, here is a step-by-step guide to adding notes. And you can see how to create highlights here.

Boards, Notes, and Highlights on Mobile

We just released a new version of the Feedly Mobile application for both iOS and Android. You can download them for free from the App Store and Google Play Store.

Here is a quick overview of the new features included in this release.

New Richer Cards

We enhanced the design of the card view. The new design is more readable and more modular. It allows us to surface notes and highlights when needed.

The modular design creates a uniform experience

New Notes Feature

If you are on a Feedly Pro or Teams plan, you can create notes to capture your thoughts and enrich articles with unique insights. Mention your friends and teammates by email to quickly share articles (along with your notes and highlights).

Enrich articles with your insights

New Highlights Feature

If you are part of the Pro or Teams plan, you can also highlight important passages that you want to come back to later. Share those passages with friends and teammates.

Press and drag to select the important text, then tap Highlight

New Team Boards section

If you are part of a Teams plan, you will see a new Team Boards section in the left navigation menu. This new section allows you to quickly access all the articles saved by your teammates across all the Team Boards you follow.

Your Personal Boards are listed on top of your Team Feeds and Boards

New iOS and Android Share Extensions

On both iOS and Android—from any app or mobile browser—our Save to Board extension gives you the option to save articles to your Feedly Boards (Personal or Team).

Open your phone’s share options and select the Feedly “Save to Board” extension

One More Thing: Faster Feed Search

We redesigned the feed search experience so that you get faster and more relevant auto-completion and a broader set of topic suggestions. Finding the sources you want to follow is now faster and more relevant than before.

Mobile search returns a greater breadth of topics and sources

 Bug fixes

We also took advantage of this new build to fix some bugs:

  • We changed the Buffer integration to avoid the crashes caused by the old SDK
  • For Android users, the share with email option now includes the URL of the article being shared

We look forward to seeing what the community does with Boards, Notes and Highlights on mobile. If you have questions, please leave a comment and we will be happy to answer them.

Feeling Mobile?Download the latest Feedly mobile and test drive these new features

Boards, Notes, and Highlights on Mobile

We just released a new version of the Feedly Mobile application for both iOS and Android. You can download them for free from the App Store and Google Play Store.

Here is a quick overview of the new features included in this release.

New Richer Cards

We enhanced the design of the card view. The new design is more readable and more modular. It allows us to surface notes and highlights when needed.

The modular design creates a uniform experience

New Notes Feature

If you are on a Feedly Pro or Teams plan, you can create notes to capture your thoughts and enrich articles with unique insights. Mention your friends and teammates by email to quickly share articles (along with your notes and highlights).

Enrich articles with your insights

New Highlights Feature

If you are part of the Pro or Teams plan, you can also highlight important passages that you want to come back to later. Share those passages with friends and teammates.

Press and drag to select the important text, then tap Highlight

New Team Boards section

If you are part of a Teams plan, you will see a new Team Boards section in the left navigation menu. This new section allows you to quickly access all the articles saved by your teammates across all the Team Boards you follow.

Your Personal Boards are listed on top of your Team Feeds and Boards

New iOS and Android Share Extensions

On both iOS and Android—from any app or mobile browser—our Save to Board extension gives you the option to save articles to your Feedly Boards (Personal or Team).

Open your phone’s share options and select the Feedly “Save to Board” extension

One More Thing: Faster Feed Search

We redesigned the feed search experience so that you get faster and more relevant auto-completion and a broader set of topic suggestions. Finding the sources you want to follow is now faster and more relevant than before.

Mobile search returns a greater breadth of topics and sources

 Bug fixes

We also took advantage of this new build to fix some bugs:

  • We changed the Buffer integration to avoid the crashes caused by the old SDK
  • For Android users, the share with email option now includes the URL of the article being shared

We look forward to seeing what the community does with Boards, Notes and Highlights on mobile. If you have questions, please leave a comment and we will be happy to answer them.

Feeling Mobile?Download the latest Feedly mobile and test drive these new features

New feedly Pro with notes and highlights

Notes and Highlights

Reading shapes what you know, who you are, and how you think. Reading is your silent teacher and mentor. With the new highlights feature, you can easily save the magic moments when you connect to new ideas – and come back to them more easily.

If you are not interested in using the new notes feature and would like to save the space at the top of your stories, there is a preference knob in your preferences page to turn this feature off.

Better WordPress Integration

If part of your workflow is saving excerpts of the best stories you discover in your feedly to one of your WordPress blogs, the new feedly Pro will save you a lot of time.

Simply click on the WordPress icon in the share toolbar and feedly will launch the WordPress PressIt window with the story you are reading. Quickly pick a picture, a category, or a tag, add your point of view and click on publish!

You can also personalize the excerpt that gets associated with the story by selecting a snippet of text before clicking on the WordPress icon.

WordPress is continuously improving their PressIt feature so we highly recommend upgrading to WordPress 4 if you want to benefit from the latest improvements.

IFTTT and Zapier

The new feedly Pro also includes a better integration with IFTTT and Zapier. This new version integrates with those platforms in real-time. For example, as soon as a story is saved to one of your personal knowledge boards (the new name for tags), all the recipes and zaps which are bound to that event are fired in real-time. We also improved the logic for image selection for recipes which require an image.

Faster Experience

We are working continuously behind the scenes to optimize feedly and add the hardware needed to keep feedly fast and boost your productivity. Here is a blog post about the performance optimizations we are currently working on.

Thank You!

Thank you for your backing: we are very grateful to be funded by our customers and to control our destiny.

 

What Goes Down Better Come Up a.k.a. Adventures in Hbase Diagnostics

Earlier this year, the feedly cloud had a rough patch: API requests and feed updates started slowing down, eventually reaching the point where we experienced outages for a few days during our busiest time of the day (weekday mornings). For a cloud based company, being down for any period of time is soul-crushing never mind for a few mornings in a row. This led to a lot of frustration, late nights, and general questioning of the order of the universe. But with some persistence we managed to get through it and figure out the problem. We thought it may be some combination of instructive and interesting for others to hear, so we’re sharing the story.

But first we’d especially like to thank Lars George. Lars is a central figure in the HBase community who has now founded a consulting company, OpenCore. It’s essentially impossible to find a great consultant in these situations, but through a bit of luck Lars happened to be in the Bay Area during this period and stopped by our offices for a few days to help out. His deep understanding of the HBase source code as well as past experiences was pivotal in diagnosing the problem.

The Cloud Distilled

Boiled down to basics, the feedly cloud does 2 things, downloads new articles from websites (which we call “polling”) and serve API requests so users can read articles via our website, mobile apps, and even third party applications like reeder. This sounds simple, and in some sense it is. Where it gets complex is the scale at which our system operates. On the polling side, there are about 40 million sources producing over 1000 articles every second. On the API side, we have about 10 million users generating over 200 million API requests per day. That’s a whole lotta bytes flowing through the system.

 

feedly Cloud diagram
the main components of the cloud

Due to this amount of data, the feedly cloud has grown significantly over the last 3 years: crawling more feeds, serving more users, and archiving more historical content – to allow users to search, go back in time, and dig deeper into topics.

Another source of complexity is openness. As a co-founder, this is one aspect of feedly that I really love. We allow essentially any website to be able to connect with any user. We also allow 3rd party apps to use our API in their application. As an engineer, this can cause lots of headaches. Sourcing article data from other websites leads to all kinds of strange edge cases — 50MB articles, weird/incorrect character encodings, etc. And 3rd party apps can generate strange/inefficient access patterns.

Both of these factors combine to make performance problems particularly hard to diagnose.

What Happened

We experienced degraded performance during the week of April 10th and more severe outages the following week. It was fairly easy to narrow the problem down to our database (HBase). In fact, In the weeks prior, we noticed occasional ‘blips’ in performance and during those blips a slowdown in database operations, albeit on a much smaller scale.

Artist depiction of the feedly cloud raining down destruction
The feedly cloud was not so happy that week, my friends.

Fortunately our ops team had already been collecting hbase metrics into a graphing system. I can’t emphasize how important this was. Without any historical information, we’d be at a total loss as to what had changed in the system. After poking around the many, many, many HBase metrics we found something that looked off (the “fsSyncLatencyAvgTime” metric). Better still, these anomalies roughly lined up with our down times. This led us to come up with a few theories:

  1. We were writing larger values. This could occur if user or article data changed somehow or due to a buggy code change.
  2. We were writing more data overall. Perhaps some new features we built were overwhelming HBase.
  3. Some hardware problem.
  4. We hit some kind of system limit in HBase and things were slowing down due to the amount or structure of our data.

Unfortunately all these theories are extremely hard to prove or disprove, and each team member has his own personal favorite. This is where Lars’s experience really helped. After reviewing the graphs, he dismissed the “system limit” theory. Our cluster is much smaller than some other companies out there and the configuration seemed sane. His feeling was it was a hardware/networking issue, but there was no clear indicator.

Theory 1: Writing Larger Values

This theory was kind of a long shot. The idea is that perhaps every so often we were writing really big values and that caused hbase to have issues. We added more metrics (this is a common theme when performance problems hit) to track when outlier read/write sizes occur, e.g. if we read or wrote a value larger than 5MB. After examining the charts, large read/writes kind of lined up with slowdowns but not really. To eliminate this as a possibility, we added an option to reject any large read/writes in our code. This wouldn’t be a final solution — all you oddballs that subscribe to 20,000 sources wouldn’t be able to access your feedly — but it let us confirm that this was not the root cause as we continued to have problems.

Theory 2: Writing More Data

This theory was perhaps more plausible than theory 1. The idea was that as feedly is growing, we eventually just reached a point where our request volume was too much for our database cluster to handle. We again added some metrics to track overall data read and write rates to hbase. Here again, things kind of lined up but not really. But we noticed we had high write volume on our analytics data table. This table contains a lot of valuable information for us, but we decided to disable all read/write activity to it as it’s not system critical.

After deploying the change, things got much better! Hour long outages were reduced to a few small blips. But this didn’t sit well with us. Our cluster is pretty sizable, and should be able to handle our request load. Also, the rate of increase in downtime was way faster than our increase in storage used or request rate. So we left the analytics table disabled to keep performance manageable but continued the hunt.

Theory 3: Hardware Problem

As a software engineer this is always my favorite theory. It generally means I’ve done nothing wrong and don’t have to do anything to fix the problem. Unfortunately hardware fails in a myriad of oddball ways, so it can be very hard to convince everyone this is the cause and more importantly to identify the failing piece of equipment. This ended up being the root cause, but was particularly hard to pin down in this case.

How we Found the Problem and Fixed it

Here again, Lars’s experience helped us out. He recommended isolating the HBase code where the problem surfaced and then creating a reproducible test by running it in a standalone manner. So after about a day of work I was able to build a test we could run on our database machines, but independent of our production data. And it reproduced the problem! When debugging intermittent issues, having a reproducible test case is 90% of the battle. I was able to enable all the database log messages during the test and I noticed 2 machines were always involved in operations when slowdowns occurred, dn1 and dn3.

I then extended the test to separately simulate the networking and disk write behavior the HBase code performed. This let us narrow down the problem down to a network issue. We removed the 2 nodes from our production cluster and things immediately got better. Our ops team found out the problem was actually in a network cable or patch panel. This was an especially insidious failure as it didn’t manifest itself in any machine logs. Incidentally, network issues was actually Lars’s original guess as to the problem!

sync latency
The metric in question when we fixed the problem. Notice the immediate change in behavior.

Lessons Learned

The important thing when dealing with performance problems (outside of, you know, fixing them) is trying to learn what you did well and what you could have done better.

Things we did well:

  • Have a good metrics collection/graphing system in place. This should go without saying, but lots of times these types of projects can get delayed or deferred.
  • Get expert help. There’s lots of great resources out there. If you can’t find a great consultant, lots of people are generally willing to help on message boards or other places.
  • Stayed focused/methodical. It can get crazy when things are going wrong, but having a scientific process and logical way to attack the problem can make things manageable.
  • Dig into our tech stack. We rely almost exclusively on open source software. This enabled us to really understand and debug what was going on.

Things we could have done better:

  • Communicate. While Lars suggested networking, I initially discounted it since the problem manifested everywhere in our system, not just one machine. I would have learned there are some shared resources specific to data center build outs.
  • Gone more quickly to the hardware possibility. We did a lot of google searching for the symptoms we were seeing in our system, but there was not much out there. This is kind of an indicator something weird is probably happening in your environment. A hardware issue is pretty likely.
  • Attacked the problem earlier. As I mentioned, we had seen small blips prior to the outages and even done some (mostly unproductive) diagnostic work. Unfortunately not giving this top priority came back to bite us.
The feedly cloud today, hardy and hale.

But there’s a happy ending to this story. As this post hopefully demonstrates, we’ve learned a lot and came out stronger: the feedly cloud is faster than ever and we have a much better understanding of the inner workings of HBase. We realize speed is very important to our users and will continue to invest in making the feedly Cloud faster and more resilient. Speaking of resilience, though we had a small downturn in feedly pro signups in April, we are back to normal. This speaks to what a great community we have!

What Goes Down Better Come Up a.k.a. Adventures in Hbase Diagnostics

Earlier this year, the feedly cloud had a rough patch: API requests and feed updates started slowing down, eventually reaching the point where we experienced outages for a few days during our busiest time of the day (weekday mornings). For a cloud based company, being down for any period of time is soul-crushing never mind for a few mornings in a row. This led to a lot of frustration, late nights, and general questioning of the order of the universe. But with some persistence we managed to get through it and figure out the problem. We thought it may be some combination of instructive and interesting for others to hear, so we’re sharing the story.

But first we’d especially like to thank Lars George. Lars is a central figure in the HBase community who has now founded a consulting company, OpenCore. It’s essentially impossible to find a great consultant in these situations, but through a bit of luck Lars happened to be in the Bay Area during this period and stopped by our offices for a few days to help out. His deep understanding of the HBase source code as well as past experiences was pivotal in diagnosing the problem.

The Cloud Distilled

Boiled down to basics, the feedly cloud does 2 things, downloads new articles from websites (which we call “polling”) and serve API requests so users can read articles via our website, mobile apps, and even third party applications like reeder. This sounds simple, and in some sense it is. Where it gets complex is the scale at which our system operates. On the polling side, there are about 40 million sources producing over 1000 articles every second. On the API side, we have about 10 million users generating over 200 million API requests per day. That’s a whole lotta bytes flowing through the system.

 

feedly Cloud diagram
the main components of the cloud

Due to this amount of data, the feedly cloud has grown significantly over the last 3 years: crawling more feeds, serving more users, and archiving more historical content – to allow users to search, go back in time, and dig deeper into topics.

Another source of complexity is openness. As a co-founder, this is one aspect of feedly that I really love. We allow essentially any website to be able to connect with any user. We also allow 3rd party apps to use our API in their application. As an engineer, this can cause lots of headaches. Sourcing article data from other websites leads to all kinds of strange edge cases — 50MB articles, weird/incorrect character encodings, etc. And 3rd party apps can generate strange/inefficient access patterns.

Both of these factors combine to make performance problems particularly hard to diagnose.

What Happened

We experienced degraded performance during the week of April 10th and more severe outages the following week. It was fairly easy to narrow the problem down to our database (HBase). In fact, In the weeks prior, we noticed occasional ‘blips’ in performance and during those blips a slowdown in database operations, albeit on a much smaller scale.

Artist depiction of the feedly cloud raining down destruction
The feedly cloud was not so happy that week, my friends.

Fortunately our ops team had already been collecting hbase metrics into a graphing system. I can’t emphasize how important this was. Without any historical information, we’d be at a total loss as to what had changed in the system. After poking around the many, many, many HBase metrics we found something that looked off (the “fsSyncLatencyAvgTime” metric). Better still, these anomalies roughly lined up with our down times. This led us to come up with a few theories:

  1. We were writing larger values. This could occur if user or article data changed somehow or due to a buggy code change.
  2. We were writing more data overall. Perhaps some new features we built were overwhelming HBase.
  3. Some hardware problem.
  4. We hit some kind of system limit in HBase and things were slowing down due to the amount or structure of our data.

Unfortunately all these theories are extremely hard to prove or disprove, and each team member has his own personal favorite. This is where Lars’s experience really helped. After reviewing the graphs, he dismissed the “system limit” theory. Our cluster is much smaller than some other companies out there and the configuration seemed sane. His feeling was it was a hardware/networking issue, but there was no clear indicator.

Theory 1: Writing Larger Values

This theory was kind of a long shot. The idea is that perhaps every so often we were writing really big values and that caused hbase to have issues. We added more metrics (this is a common theme when performance problems hit) to track when outlier read/write sizes occur, e.g. if we read or wrote a value larger than 5MB. After examining the charts, large read/writes kind of lined up with slowdowns but not really. To eliminate this as a possibility, we added an option to reject any large read/writes in our code. This wouldn’t be a final solution — all you oddballs that subscribe to 20,000 sources wouldn’t be able to access your feedly — but it let us confirm that this was not the root cause as we continued to have problems.

Theory 2: Writing More Data

This theory was perhaps more plausible than theory 1. The idea was that as feedly is growing, we eventually just reached a point where our request volume was too much for our database cluster to handle. We again added some metrics to track overall data read and write rates to hbase. Here again, things kind of lined up but not really. But we noticed we had high write volume on our analytics data table. This table contains a lot of valuable information for us, but we decided to disable all read/write activity to it as it’s not system critical.

After deploying the change, things got much better! Hour long outages were reduced to a few small blips. But this didn’t sit well with us. Our cluster is pretty sizable, and should be able to handle our request load. Also, the rate of increase in downtime was way faster than our increase in storage used or request rate. So we left the analytics table disabled to keep performance manageable but continued the hunt.

Theory 3: Hardware Problem

As a software engineer this is always my favorite theory. It generally means I’ve done nothing wrong and don’t have to do anything to fix the problem. Unfortunately hardware fails in a myriad of oddball ways, so it can be very hard to convince everyone this is the cause and more importantly to identify the failing piece of equipment. This ended up being the root cause, but was particularly hard to pin down in this case.

How we Found the Problem and Fixed it

Here again, Lars’s experience helped us out. He recommended isolating the HBase code where the problem surfaced and then creating a reproducible test by running it in a standalone manner. So after about a day of work I was able to build a test we could run on our database machines, but independent of our production data. And it reproduced the problem! When debugging intermittent issues, having a reproducible test case is 90% of the battle. I was able to enable all the database log messages during the test and I noticed 2 machines were always involved in operations when slowdowns occurred, dn1 and dn3.

I then extended the test to separately simulate the networking and disk write behavior the HBase code performed. This let us narrow down the problem down to a network issue. We removed the 2 nodes from our production cluster and things immediately got better. Our ops team found out the problem was actually in a network cable or patch panel. This was an especially insidious failure as it didn’t manifest itself in any machine logs. Incidentally, network issues was actually Lars’s original guess as to the problem!

sync latency
The metric in question when we fixed the problem. Notice the immediate change in behavior.

Lessons Learned

The important thing when dealing with performance problems (outside of, you know, fixing them) is trying to learn what you did well and what you could have done better.

Things we did well:

  • Have a good metrics collection/graphing system in place. This should go without saying, but lots of times these types of projects can get delayed or deferred.
  • Get expert help. There’s lots of great resources out there. If you can’t find a great consultant, lots of people are generally willing to help on message boards or other places.
  • Stayed focused/methodical. It can get crazy when things are going wrong, but having a scientific process and logical way to attack the problem can make things manageable.
  • Dig into our tech stack. We rely almost exclusively on open source software. This enabled us to really understand and debug what was going on.

Things we could have done better:

  • Communicate. While Lars suggested networking, I initially discounted it since the problem manifested everywhere in our system, not just one machine. I would have learned there are some shared resources specific to data center build outs.
  • Gone more quickly to the hardware possibility. We did a lot of google searching for the symptoms we were seeing in our system, but there was not much out there. This is kind of an indicator something weird is probably happening in your environment. A hardware issue is pretty likely.
  • Attacked the problem earlier. As I mentioned, we had seen small blips prior to the outages and even done some (mostly unproductive) diagnostic work. Unfortunately not giving this top priority came back to bite us.
The feedly cloud today, hardy and hale.

But there’s a happy ending to this story. As this post hopefully demonstrates, we’ve learned a lot and came out stronger: the feedly cloud is faster than ever and we have a much better understanding of the inner workings of HBase. We realize speed is very important to our users and will continue to invest in making the feedly Cloud faster and more resilient. Speaking of resilience, though we had a small downturn in feedly pro signups in April, we are back to normal. This speaks to what a great community we have!

Help us choose your new Organize experience

Feedly is the best way to ingest the content you need for work by putting your favorite feeds in an organized newsfeed. Over the past few weeks we have rethought the way you can clean up and reorganize your feedly. I worked with the feedly team to design two different concepts and would love to hear your feedback to help us build the best organized experience possible!

In a recent survey with 5,000 participants, many of you showed us that you like to reorganize your feedly for two main reasons:

Spring cleaning
Every once in a while you need to clean up your feedly to make sure you only follow the feeds that interest you. This involves removing inactive feeds (the ones that have not published in months), removing the feeds you don’t read anymore, and promoting articles to “must-read” publications, so you don’t miss a story.

Reorganization
There are other times when you feel like reorganizing parts or all of your feedly. Maybe you have new interests or you want to split a topic into a few more specific topics, such as splitting your Marketing Collection into SEO and Digital Marketing Collections. All of this involves renaming Collections, moving them around and moving feeds from one Collection to another.

After a few weeks of design work with these two use cases in mind, we came up with two design directions:

Concept 1: Organize At a Glance

The main idea behind this concept is that everything is available in one page with just the crucial information you need to optimize your feedly. Your collections are listed on the right and the selected Collection’s feeds appear at the center of the page. This enables you to move from Collection to Collection without switching context.

You can try out this concept on InVision: https://invis.io/D567GADVZ

Selected-Design

View important information at a glance
With this first concept we are showing you the essential information you need when you need it, no less, no more. For instance, when looking at a Collection you will see the feeds that are Must Read and those which are inactive. It’s just enough information for you to take action with no clutter.

Because your Collections are listed on the right side, you can easily navigate from one to the other rapidly.

Take the main actions in one click
Most actions are one click away or one drag away. Hit the cross or the star icon to remove a feed from a Collection or mark a feed as must read, respectively (see below for examples). Use drag and drop gestures to move a feed to the Collection it should belong to and re-order your Collections.

_
Making a feed must read

minimal-mustread

_
Moving a feeds to a different Collection

minimal-movefeed

_
Reordering a Collection

minimal-movecollection

 

Concept 2: Organize with Deep Site Information

This second concept takes advantage of data tables and the feedly slider. The main page displays all of your Collections. After you select a Collection we use the feedly slider to show all of the feeds it contains.

This concept focuses on showing you as much information as possible in a consistent way so you can easily decide what action to take on each item.

You can try out this concept on InVision: https://invis.io/ED67GAMB2

_
Concept 2: Collection list

advanced-intro1

_
Concept 2: feed list

advanced-intro2

 

See all the data you need
Both the Collection list page and the feed list slider are tables displaying all the information you need to quickly undestand where you should take action. Quickly see which Collections have the most inactive feeds and which feeds last posted a long time ago.

_
Last posted data on feed list

advanced-feedata

Use a consistent popup to edit your feeds
Whether you want to edit the name of a feeds, mark it as read, remove it from a Collection, move to a different one or add it to multiple Collections, a consistent dropdown menu will be there to accomplish all these tasks across the application.

_
Editing a feed

advanced-movingfeeds

_
Reordering a Collection

advanced-movecollection

Both of these concepts are available on InVision (here and there). There are a few things you can interact with so you can get a feel for them. Have a look and let us know about what works and what doesn’t. Feel free to leave comments here or within the InVision prototypes.

We are looking forward to listening to your feedback!
Antoine and the feedly Team.

Get our State of Content Marketing report

Help us choose your new Organize experience

Feedly is the best way to ingest the content you need for work by putting your favorite feeds in an organized newsfeed. Over the past few weeks we have rethought the way you can clean up and reorganize your feedly. I worked with the feedly team to design two different concepts and would love to hear your feedback to help us build the best organized experience possible!

In a recent survey with 5,000 participants, many of you showed us that you like to reorganize your feedly for two main reasons:

Spring cleaning
Every once in a while you need to clean up your feedly to make sure you only follow the feeds that interest you. This involves removing inactive feeds (the ones that have not published in months), removing the feeds you don’t read anymore, and promoting articles to “must-read” publications, so you don’t miss a story.

Reorganization
There are other times when you feel like reorganizing parts or all of your feedly. Maybe you have new interests or you want to split a topic into a few more specific topics, such as splitting your Marketing Collection into SEO and Digital Marketing Collections. All of this involves renaming Collections, moving them around and moving feeds from one Collection to another.

After a few weeks of design work with these two use cases in mind, we came up with two design directions:

Concept 1: Organize At a Glance

The main idea behind this concept is that everything is available in one page with just the crucial information you need to optimize your feedly. Your collections are listed on the right and the selected Collection’s feeds appear at the center of the page. This enables you to move from Collection to Collection without switching context.

You can try out this concept on InVision: https://invis.io/D567GADVZ

Selected-Design

View important information at a glance
With this first concept we are showing you the essential information you need when you need it, no less, no more. For instance, when looking at a Collection you will see the feeds that are Must Read and those which are inactive. It’s just enough information for you to take action with no clutter.

Because your Collections are listed on the right side, you can easily navigate from one to the other rapidly.

Take the main actions in one click
Most actions are one click away or one drag away. Hit the cross or the star icon to remove a feed from a Collection or mark a feed as must read, respectively (see below for examples). Use drag and drop gestures to move a feed to the Collection it should belong to and re-order your Collections.

_
Making a feed must read

minimal-mustread

_
Moving a feeds to a different Collection

minimal-movefeed

_
Reordering a Collection

minimal-movecollection

 

Concept 2: Organize with Deep Site Information

This second concept takes advantage of data tables and the feedly slider. The main page displays all of your Collections. After you select a Collection we use the feedly slider to show all of the feeds it contains.

This concept focuses on showing you as much information as possible in a consistent way so you can easily decide what action to take on each item.

You can try out this concept on InVision: https://invis.io/ED67GAMB2

_
Concept 2: Collection list

advanced-intro1

_
Concept 2: feed list

advanced-intro2

 

See all the data you need
Both the Collection list page and the feed list slider are tables displaying all the information you need to quickly undestand where you should take action. Quickly see which Collections have the most inactive feeds and which feeds last posted a long time ago.

_
Last posted data on feed list

advanced-feedata

Use a consistent popup to edit your feeds
Whether you want to edit the name of a feeds, mark it as read, remove it from a Collection, move to a different one or add it to multiple Collections, a consistent dropdown menu will be there to accomplish all these tasks across the application.

_
Editing a feed

advanced-movingfeeds

_
Reordering a Collection

advanced-movecollection

Both of these concepts are available on InVision (here and there). There are a few things you can interact with so you can get a feel for them. Have a look and let us know about what works and what doesn’t. Feel free to leave comments here or within the InVision prototypes.

We are looking forward to listening to your feedback!
Antoine and the feedly Team.

Get our State of Content Marketing report

Announcing feedly Login

Screenshot 2015-11-11 22.36.13

 

Today, we’re excited to bring you feedly Login, a new way to add a dedicated feedly login to your feedly newsfeed.

This means that you have the freedom to keep your newsfeed separate from your social logins, if you prefer to, and get even more control over your privacy. It is an optional feature: If you are happy with your existing login, you can ignore this post and continue to use your existing login without making any changes.

Adding a feedly Login to your existing login options is easy:

  • Go to http://feedly.com/i/logins
  • Click on the “Add login” button
  • Select the “Add feedly login” option
  • Enter the email and password you would like to use for your feedly login

Once you have added a feedly Login to your account, you may choose to remove the previously used social logins. Or you could choose to keep multiple logins for your newsfeed.

You can also use feedly Login on your phone or tablet. To do that, please upgrade to the latest versions feedly for iOS and feedly for Android.

We are happy to cross this highly requested feature off the roadmap we shared with the community last month. Thanks to the feedly Pro funding, the development of new features is accelerating. Thank you for your backing!

We look forward to hearing what you think and answering any questions you may have.

/David, Arthur, Edwin, Noelle

FAQs

Q: Do I have to use the feedly login?
Nope, you don’t have to. You can keep using your current login credentials and not touch anything, if you wish.

Q: What are the password rules?
Your password must be at least eight characters long. That’s it!

Q: Does my password expire?
No, it doesn’t expire.

Q: I got an email to confirm my feedly email address. Do I have to click on the link?
The short answer is yes. It’s a good idea to confirm your email because it will enable you to reset your password if you forget it.

Q: Can I reset my password?
Yes, if you forgot your password, you can reset it from the login page and we’ll send you instructions. We can only send an email if you have verified your email address (see above).

Get our State of Content Marketing report

Announcing feedly Login

Screenshot 2015-11-11 22.36.13

 

Today, we’re excited to bring you feedly Login, a new way to add a dedicated feedly login to your feedly newsfeed.

This means that you have the freedom to keep your newsfeed separate from your social logins, if you prefer to, and get even more control over your privacy. It is an optional feature: If you are happy with your existing login, you can ignore this post and continue to use your existing login without making any changes.

Adding a feedly Login to your existing login options is easy:

  • Go to http://feedly.com/i/logins
  • Click on the “Add login” button
  • Select the “Add feedly login” option
  • Enter the email and password you would like to use for your feedly login

Once you have added a feedly Login to your account, you may choose to remove the previously used social logins. Or you could choose to keep multiple logins for your newsfeed.

You can also use feedly Login on your phone or tablet. To do that, please upgrade to the latest versions feedly for iOS and feedly for Android.

We are happy to cross this highly requested feature off the roadmap we shared with the community last month. Thanks to the feedly Pro funding, the development of new features is accelerating. Thank you for your backing!

We look forward to hearing what you think and answering any questions you may have.

/David, Arthur, Edwin, Noelle

FAQs

Q: Do I have to use the feedly login?
Nope, you don’t have to. You can keep using your current login credentials and not touch anything, if you wish.

Q: What are the password rules?
Your password must be at least eight characters long. That’s it!

Q: Does my password expire?
No, it doesn’t expire.

Q: I got an email to confirm my feedly email address. Do I have to click on the link?
The short answer is yes. It’s a good idea to confirm your email because it will enable you to reset your password if you forget it.

Q: Can I reset my password?
Yes, if you forgot your password, you can reset it from the login page and we’ll send you instructions. We can only send an email if you have verified your email address (see above).

Get our State of Content Marketing report

Safari Viewer, San Francisco and 3D touch – New feedly for iOS

feedly for iOS 9

The new feedly for iOS is available for download in the App Store. This update takes advantage of the enhancements in iOS 9, reduces crashes, and improves battery consumption.

Get feedly for iOS

01. Safari viewer

Safari viewer

We integrated feedly with the new iOS 9 Safari viewer so that when you open websites you can take advantage of the full power of Safari.

02. San Francisco font

San Francisco Font

As part of iOS 9, Apple designed a new font called San Francisco which is more readable at small sizes and more beautiful when used for headlines. For those using this new operating system, we transitioned feedly’s fonts from Helvetica to San Francisco to take advantage of those new features. We are also offering you an option to use San Francisco as the default article font, if you prefer a sans serif reading experience.

03. No more background activity

Your battery is going to love this change.

04. Home screen quick actions

feedly home screen quick actions

If you are running iPhone 6s, you can force touch the feedly app icon and quickly jump to your today, your must reads, your saved storied, or the explore section.

05. Fixes a few crashes

There were a few crash reports in the reviews. We hate crashes as much as anybody else, so we took the time to rewrite how webpages are loaded in feedly and optimize what happens when you swipe from one story to another. This should result in fewer crashes.

Get feedly for iOS

We are excited to check off one of the items in the roadmap we shared with the community last week.

-Michal, Arthur and Edwin

60,000 Pro subscribers and what to expect next

Screenshot 2015-10-15 15.53.38

Today we passed an exciting new milestone: 60,000 users have subscribed to feedly Pro. We would like to take a moment and thank each one of you and share some of the projects we are working on, thanks to this new funding.

1. More servers – The feedly cloud is connected to 42,000,000 feeds of information, receiving about 50,000,000 new stories every day. We are adding servers to the feedly Cloud to store, organize, and index all of this information so that we can continue to serve you feedly very fast.

 2. Feedly login (#delivered / Nov 16th 2015 / Announcement) – This is something a lot of users have been requesting for some time. We now have the resources to fund this project and make it a reality. We will continue to offer the ability to log in with Google, Facebook, Twitter, Microsoft, and Evernote to people who prefer to use existing logins. We are also adding support for logging in with Slack and Office 365, since we hear that it will make logging in even easier for some of our users.

3. Shared tags – When we released Shared Collections last month, some users asked us to go one step further and also allow them to share some of their tags. We really like this idea and are working on both continuing to enhance Shared Collections and adding shared tags.

4. Filtering, saved search, and noise reduction – We have been hearing a lot of murmurs from you around the need for filtering and for alerts. We are going to use part of the new Pro funding for a project that will allow you to define manual and automated filters. It will also allow you to save searches as alerts. We love the idea of giving you even more control over how to tailor your feedly. More signal, less noise.

5. Better Slack integration – We think that we can reduce some of the friction that exists around manually sharing stories from your feedly into your Slack channels. Many users are  using feedly and Slack in tandem, so we are going to invest some time enhancing the integration.

6. Fewer iOS crashes (#delivered / Oct 21st 2015 / Announcement)– We have been receiving some reports of iOS crashes. They seem related to loading web pages, videos, and animated gifs within feedly. We hate crashes as much as anyone else, and we are fixing this. We are investing time into a new update of the feedly iOS application which changes how we load content and minimizes the risk of the application crashing. We are also investing time optimizing how we serve content to minimize battery usage. You should see the fruits of this work in the v30 update of the app which should be available within a few weeks.

7. Team edition – More on that soon…

Thanks to your backing, we’re able to continuously invest in building a better, faster, stronger and more useful work newsfeed. It is a great pleasure to serve you.

Edwin, Noelle and Remi

60,000 Pro subscribers and what to expect next

Screenshot 2015-10-15 15.53.38

Today we passed an exciting new milestone: 60,000 users have subscribed to feedly Pro. We would like to take a moment and thank each one of you and share some of the projects we are working on, thanks to this new funding.

1. More servers – The feedly cloud is connected to 42,000,000 feeds of information, receiving about 50,000,000 new stories every day. We are adding servers to the feedly Cloud to store, organize, and index all of this information so that we can continue to serve you feedly very fast.

 2. Feedly login (#delivered / Nov 16th 2015 / Announcement) – This is something a lot of users have been requesting for some time. We now have the resources to fund this project and make it a reality. We will continue to offer the ability to log in with Google, Facebook, Twitter, Microsoft, and Evernote to people who prefer to use existing logins. We are also adding support for logging in with Slack and Office 365, since we hear that it will make logging in even easier for some of our users.

3. Shared tags – When we released Shared Collections last month, some users asked us to go one step further and also allow them to share some of their tags. We really like this idea and are working on both continuing to enhance Shared Collections and adding shared tags.

4. Filtering, saved search, and noise reduction – We have been hearing a lot of murmurs from you around the need for filtering and for alerts. We are going to use part of the new Pro funding for a project that will allow you to define manual and automated filters. It will also allow you to save searches as alerts. We love the idea of giving you even more control over how to tailor your feedly. More signal, less noise.

5. Better Slack integration – We think that we can reduce some of the friction that exists around manually sharing stories from your feedly into your Slack channels. Many users are  using feedly and Slack in tandem, so we are going to invest some time enhancing the integration.

6. Fewer iOS crashes (#delivered / Oct 21st 2015 / Announcement)– We have been receiving some reports of iOS crashes. They seem related to loading web pages, videos, and animated gifs within feedly. We hate crashes as much as anyone else, and we are fixing this. We are investing time into a new update of the feedly iOS application which changes how we load content and minimizes the risk of the application crashing. We are also investing time optimizing how we serve content to minimize battery usage. You should see the fruits of this work in the v30 update of the app which should be available within a few weeks.

7. Team edition – More on that soon…

Thanks to your backing, we’re able to continuously invest in building a better, faster, stronger and more useful work newsfeed. It is a great pleasure to serve you.

Edwin, Noelle and Remi

Meet Shared Collections: Now you can choose to share what you read with others

Try Shared Collections NowRead Tutorial

At feedly, we believe at our core that knowledge is power, and thus content is empowering—and even more so when you share it!

So we are excited to introduce today a new feedly Pro feature we call Shared Collections—a new and highly requested tool that lets you choose to share what you read with your teammates, colleagues, and followings.

With Shared Collections, you can take the collections of reading sources you’ve already created—or create a new collection for the purpose of sharing—and make them public on one shared collections page dedicated just for you or your team. This Shared Collection page will showcase all of the blogs, publications, YouTube feeds, and Google News Alerts you want to showcase and make it easy for other people to follow the same sources with just a click. It’ll also allow you to create a personalized URL for your Shared Collections (nab the one you want today!).

Take that Shared Collections page and use it to collaborate with others or to show the world what feeds your mind. You can even customize it to fit your company’s identity or your personal brand.

Screenshot 2015-09-01 08.15.18

Shared Collections is completely opt-in. All of your collections default to private, so you can make use of this feature only if you want to. When you are ready to share, turn on the collections you want public and keep your personal collections private.

See Shared Collections in action.

See how ThoughtWorks, a consulting agency in San Francisco, has been using Shared Collections to collaborate across their organization and to scale their content marketing efforts:

Here are a few ways you can use your Shared Collections:

Help your organization all follow the same publications, blogs, YouTube feeds, and Google Alerts. Empower your workforce to read and share.

Lead your industry by curating and sharing a rich list of must-follow reads. Lead others by showing them the important sources in your industry and move everyone forward together.

Help your teammates and peers find the best publications, blogs, YouTube feeds, and Google Alerts to do their jobs and join the conversation. Keep your teammates informed, moving in the same direction, and inspired with new ideas.

Make it easy to promote your company or agency’s thought leadership by putting all of your employees’ blogs and social media in one easy-to-follow branded page. Provide your customers, clients, social media following, and observers with a one-stop shop to find all of the resources created by your company. Perfect for any company in content marketing or with an employee social media program.

Organize your social media curation efforts by getting your team organized with the same sources. Need to feed the Content Monster? Arm your social media team with lots of publications and blogs to find entertaining posts.

Looking for some inspiration? Go to http://feedly.com/i/discover to browse other people’s Collections. Here are just a few we love:

Screen Shot 2015-08-27 at 11.33.19 AM
Guy Kawasaki’s Shared Collection page – See how he feeds his social media channels, i.e. “The Content Monster.”

Screen Shot 2015-08-27 at 11.35.04 AM
MIT’s Shared Collection page – Get all of MIT’s rich—and often free—resources in one place. Easily browse MIT’s feed by department and add their content to get the latest on what one of the world’s best universities is doing at the forefront of science and technology.

Screen Shot 2015-08-27 at 11.36.14 AM
Seth Godin’s Shared Collection page – See what this marketing expert reads about marketing, so you can become an expert, too.

Screen Shot 2015-08-27 at 11.38.36 AM
Annie Cushing’s Shared Collection page –  Annie, who is a data analytics and SEO expert, uses her Shared Collection page to share interesting sites on a daily basis to her friends and colleagues on social media.

Screen Shot 2015-08-31 at 10.54.13 PM
ThoughtWorks’s Shared Collection page – As spotlighted in the video above, ThoughtWorks uses Shared Collections to provide clients resources, to boost internal collaboration and communication, and to stay connected to alumni.

Try Shared Collections NowRead Tutorial

Enjoy the feature! Please try it out and if you make a cool Shared Collection, share it with the feedly community in the comments below and we’ll spotlight our favorites. For more information on making the most of Shared Collections, you can check out the tutorial.

– Team feedly

Meet Shared Collections: Now you can choose to share what you read with others

Try Shared Collections NowRead Tutorial

At feedly, we believe at our core that knowledge is power, and thus content is empowering—and even more so when you share it!

So we are excited to introduce today a new feedly Pro feature we call Shared Collections—a new and highly requested tool that lets you choose to share what you read with your teammates, colleagues, and followings.

With Shared Collections, you can take the collections of reading sources you’ve already created—or create a new collection for the purpose of sharing—and make them public on one shared collections page dedicated just for you or your team. This Shared Collection page will showcase all of the blogs, publications, YouTube feeds, and Google News Alerts you want to showcase and make it easy for other people to follow the same sources with just a click. It’ll also allow you to create a personalized URL for your Shared Collections (nab the one you want today!).

Take that Shared Collections page and use it to collaborate with others or to show the world what feeds your mind. You can even customize it to fit your company’s identity or your personal brand.

Screenshot 2015-09-01 08.15.18

Shared Collections is completely opt-in. All of your collections default to private, so you can make use of this feature only if you want to. When you are ready to share, turn on the collections you want public and keep your personal collections private.

See Shared Collections in action.

See how ThoughtWorks, a consulting agency in San Francisco, has been using Shared Collections to collaborate across their organization and to scale their content marketing efforts:

Here are a few ways you can use your Shared Collections:

Help your organization all follow the same publications, blogs, YouTube feeds, and Google Alerts. Empower your workforce to read and share.

Lead your industry by curating and sharing a rich list of must-follow reads. Lead others by showing them the important sources in your industry and move everyone forward together.

Help your teammates and peers find the best publications, blogs, YouTube feeds, and Google Alerts to do their jobs and join the conversation. Keep your teammates informed, moving in the same direction, and inspired with new ideas.

Make it easy to promote your company or agency’s thought leadership by putting all of your employees’ blogs and social media in one easy-to-follow branded page. Provide your customers, clients, social media following, and observers with a one-stop shop to find all of the resources created by your company. Perfect for any company in content marketing or with an employee social media program.

Organize your social media curation efforts by getting your team organized with the same sources. Need to feed the Content Monster? Arm your social media team with lots of publications and blogs to find entertaining posts.

Looking for some inspiration? Go to http://feedly.com/i/discover to browse other people’s Collections. Here are just a few we love:

Screen Shot 2015-08-27 at 11.33.19 AM
Guy Kawasaki’s Shared Collection page – See how he feeds his social media channels, i.e. “The Content Monster.”

Screen Shot 2015-08-27 at 11.35.04 AM
MIT’s Shared Collection page – Get all of MIT’s rich—and often free—resources in one place. Easily browse MIT’s feed by department and add their content to get the latest on what one of the world’s best universities is doing at the forefront of science and technology.

Screen Shot 2015-08-27 at 11.36.14 AM
Seth Godin’s Shared Collection page – See what this marketing expert reads about marketing, so you can become an expert, too.

Screen Shot 2015-08-27 at 11.38.36 AM
Annie Cushing’s Shared Collection page –  Annie, who is a data analytics and SEO expert, uses her Shared Collection page to share interesting sites on a daily basis to her friends and colleagues on social media.

Screen Shot 2015-08-31 at 10.54.13 PM
ThoughtWorks’s Shared Collection page – As spotlighted in the video above, ThoughtWorks uses Shared Collections to provide clients resources, to boost internal collaboration and communication, and to stay connected to alumni.

Try Shared Collections NowRead Tutorial

Enjoy the feature! Please try it out and if you make a cool Shared Collection, share it with the feedly community in the comments below and we’ll spotlight our favorites. For more information on making the most of Shared Collections, you can check out the tutorial.

– Team feedly

feedly + Google Now: Your most important stories, when you want them

feedly-googlenow

Feedly and Google have been collaborating on integrating feedly into Google Now so that your most important stories surface in your Google Now stream. We recently rolled out this feature in beta and are seeing a high 14% tap-through rate with the feedly cards. We are excited to announce that the feature is now being rolled out to everyone.

Your important stories come to you

We believe reading sparks magic moments when ideas, knowledge, and creativity seamlessly come together. It’s the core reason why we work so hard to make feedly the most efficient way to personalize and read the content that’s important to you.

We spend a lot of time talking to our users, and we know that most of you weave what you read into your everyday life—to get better at what you do, to keep you ahead of what’s going on, to stay inspired, to learn new things, and be productive. We know that the ability to personalize this experience—when and how you get your news—and to integrate it with other services you use is just as important.

Google Now allows you to easily access specific information in the time and place that it’s most useful to you. As we keep expanding the number of integrations available to feedly users, Google Now seemed like a fitting service for our users, so that you can easily have the stories you need the most come to you, without you having to look for it yourself.

With feedly Now cards, feedly will find the trending stories in the publications you follow and surface them to you throughout the day through Google Now. And you can personalize this experience even more: If you have favorite publications or blogs that you’d love to see in Google Now, you can tell us to follow these stories more closely by marking those sources as must-read in your feedly.

For instance, if you are a PR manager in tech, you can mark the top-tier tech blogs as “must read,” so that breaking stories automagically come to you. Or if you are a physician following the latest in, say, pediatrics or infectious diseases, you can mark your favorite journals as must-read, so that the big stories from these favorite sources surface in your Google Now stream.

Turn it on!

To start seeing feedly Now cards, please make sure you have the latest Google app and feedly app installed on your Android device and are logged into feedly.com. Simply tap the blue Google app icon to see your Now cards.  You’re good to go!

feedly for Android

(You can also opt out by clicking the settings icon next to the feedly Now card in the Google Now app. Go here to learn more about turning off Google Now cards.)

Open Design Contest / Win feedly Pro lifetime

We would love to hear from the feedly community about how we could improve the personalization engine powering this feature and give you more control over which stories should be surfaced in Google Now. Please leave some suggestions by commenting on this blog post, and we’ll pick two of our favorite suggestions, implement them, and offer a lifetime feedly Pro subscription to the lucky people who suggested them!

We’ll use all of your feedback, so that we can iterate quickly on the next version of feedly Now cards, which we plan to push soon.

Enjoy!
David and Noelle

[Update: Wow! Lots of interesting comments! Thank you! We will be reviewing them in detail next Tuesday and announce the winners on Wednesday, August 12th]

feedly + Google Now: Your most important stories, when you want them

feedly-googlenow

Feedly and Google have been collaborating on integrating feedly into Google Now so that your most important stories surface in your Google Now stream. We recently rolled out this feature in beta and are seeing a high 14% tap-through rate with the feedly cards. We are excited to announce that the feature is now being rolled out to everyone.

Your important stories come to you

We believe reading sparks magic moments when ideas, knowledge, and creativity seamlessly come together. It’s the core reason why we work so hard to make feedly the most efficient way to personalize and read the content that’s important to you.

We spend a lot of time talking to our users, and we know that most of you weave what you read into your everyday life—to get better at what you do, to keep you ahead of what’s going on, to stay inspired, to learn new things, and be productive. We know that the ability to personalize this experience—when and how you get your news—and to integrate it with other services you use is just as important.

Google Now allows you to easily access specific information in the time and place that it’s most useful to you. As we keep expanding the number of integrations available to feedly users, Google Now seemed like a fitting service for our users, so that you can easily have the stories you need the most come to you, without you having to look for it yourself.

With feedly Now cards, feedly will find the trending stories in the publications you follow and surface them to you throughout the day through Google Now. And you can personalize this experience even more: If you have favorite publications or blogs that you’d love to see in Google Now, you can tell us to follow these stories more closely by marking those sources as must-read in your feedly.

For instance, if you are a PR manager in tech, you can mark the top-tier tech blogs as “must read,” so that breaking stories automagically come to you. Or if you are a physician following the latest in, say, pediatrics or infectious diseases, you can mark your favorite journals as must-read, so that the big stories from these favorite sources surface in your Google Now stream.

Turn it on!

To start seeing feedly Now cards, please make sure you have the latest Google app and feedly app installed on your Android device and are logged into feedly.com. Simply tap the blue Google app icon to see your Now cards.  You’re good to go!

feedly for Android

(You can also opt out by clicking the settings icon next to the feedly Now card in the Google Now app. Go here to learn more about turning off Google Now cards.)

Open Design Contest / Win feedly Pro lifetime

We would love to hear from the feedly community about how we could improve the personalization engine powering this feature and give you more control over which stories should be surfaced in Google Now. Please leave some suggestions by commenting on this blog post, and we’ll pick two of our favorite suggestions, implement them, and offer a lifetime feedly Pro subscription to the lucky people who suggested them!

We’ll use all of your feedback, so that we can iterate quickly on the next version of feedly Now cards, which we plan to push soon.

Enjoy!
David and Noelle

[Update: Wow! Lots of interesting comments! Thank you! We will be reviewing them in detail next Tuesday and announce the winners on Wednesday, August 12th]

Collection sharing: A new way to share your favorite sites

feedly Collection Sharing

Today we’re introducing a new feature called collection sharing, which enables you to easily share the sites you read with others.

Over the years, feedly users have curated millions amazing collections of the best sites to read on a myriad of topics, from photography to fashion, travel to home improvement, politics to finance and everything in between. Shared collections will unlock the incredible wealth of knowledge that has been created within those feedly reading lists.

Though feedly will always remain a reader app at its core, collection sharing is part of our larger vision to make reading more collaborative and create a platform for knowledge sharing within feedly. Thousands of users have told us over the past year that having better ways to share would help them at work and at school. In fact, one of the main takeaways from a survey we ran last year about this topic was that feedly readers are enthusiastic about sharing and want more ways to share what they read with friends and co-­workers.

We’re building a community of passionate readers and we’ll be inviting users who are excited to share the sites they read and represent the breadth of knowledge available in feedly.

Our plan is to open collection sharing to everyone over the next few months, starting with feedly Pro users, but you can apply now to get early access and view collections from your peers.

Explore collections and apply for access

Collection sharing: A new way to share your favorite sites

feedly Collection Sharing

Today we’re introducing a new feature called collection sharing, which enables you to easily share the sites you read with others.

Over the years, feedly users have curated millions amazing collections of the best sites to read on a myriad of topics, from photography to fashion, travel to home improvement, politics to finance and everything in between. Shared collections will unlock the incredible wealth of knowledge that has been created within those feedly reading lists.

Though feedly will always remain a reader app at its core, collection sharing is part of our larger vision to make reading more collaborative and create a platform for knowledge sharing within feedly. Thousands of users have told us over the past year that having better ways to share would help them at work and at school. In fact, one of the main takeaways from a survey we ran last year about this topic was that feedly readers are enthusiastic about sharing and want more ways to share what they read with friends and co-­workers.

We’re building a community of passionate readers and we’ll be inviting users who are excited to share the sites they read and represent the breadth of knowledge available in feedly.

Our plan is to open collection sharing to everyone over the next few months, starting with feedly Pro users, but you can apply now to get early access and view collections from your peers.

Explore collections and apply for access

Feedly Mini is back [Chrome]

feedly-mini

feedly Mini is back!

Our popular web browsing companion is officially relaunching today with a brand new user interface and a suite of new features. feedly Mini is a Chrome extension that keeps you connected to your feedly as you browse, allowing you to save, tag, share or subscribe to the great content you find each day.

A big thank you to all the users to participated to the beta program.

Get feedly Mini for Chrome

Frequently Asked Questions

Does feedly Mini work on every site?

feedly Mini should show up on most of the sites you browse allowing you to share, save or subscribe to new content — you can even save articles from sites you’re not already subscribed to. However, feedly Mini has a blacklist of sites where it shouldn’t appear, so you can specify sites on which you don’t want feedly Mini to appear (see Options to edit the blacklist). Feedly Mini will also not appear on sites that use HTTPS (SSL).

Can I disable feedly Mini?

Yes. Click on the feedly mini icon, select the gear option and you will find a checkbox that let’s enable/disable feedly Mini.

Will feedly Mini be available on Firefox or Safari?

feedly Mini is currently available only as an extension for the Chrome web browser. We’re evaluating which other browsers we should support in future releases. Please let us know in the comments below what browsers you use.

Does feedly Mini collect any information about my browsing history?

No. We value your privacy and will not collect any information about the sites you browse while feedly Mini is active.

Why doesn’t feedly Mini work on HTTPS pages?

We are just being extra cautious: we do not want to interfere with HTTPS pages and we do not want users to grant us access to HTTPS pages.

Feedly Mini is back [Chrome]

feedly-mini

feedly Mini is back!

Our popular web browsing companion is officially relaunching today with a brand new user interface and a suite of new features. feedly Mini is a Chrome extension that keeps you connected to your feedly as you browse, allowing you to save, tag, share or subscribe to the great content you find each day.

A big thank you to all the users to participated to the beta program.

Get feedly Mini for Chrome

Frequently Asked Questions

Does feedly Mini work on every site?

feedly Mini should show up on most of the sites you browse allowing you to share, save or subscribe to new content — you can even save articles from sites you’re not already subscribed to. However, feedly Mini has a blacklist of sites where it shouldn’t appear, so you can specify sites on which you don’t want feedly Mini to appear (see Options to edit the blacklist). Feedly Mini will also not appear on sites that use HTTPS (SSL).

Can I disable feedly Mini?

Yes. Click on the feedly mini icon, select the gear option and you will find a checkbox that let’s enable/disable feedly Mini.

Will feedly Mini be available on Firefox or Safari?

feedly Mini is currently available only as an extension for the Chrome web browser. We’re evaluating which other browsers we should support in future releases. Please let us know in the comments below what browsers you use.

Does feedly Mini collect any information about my browsing history?

No. We value your privacy and will not collect any information about the sites you browse while feedly Mini is active.

Why doesn’t feedly Mini work on HTTPS pages?

We are just being extra cautious: we do not want to interfere with HTTPS pages and we do not want users to grant us access to HTTPS pages.

Introducing slider: A new way to read on feedly [Updated]

Our goal at feedly is to connect readers to the sources of information they love and deliver the best possible reading experience. Based on feedback from many of our readers, we’re launching a new way to read articles in feedly we call the slider view. Here’s how it works and why we’re sure you’ll love it:

The Slider

slider-1.2

When you click on an article in feedly, that content will now appear in a card that slides open from the right edge of your screen.

Easier Reading

slider-close-1.1

While reading, this makes it super easy to jump back and forth between your list of unread articles and the content you want to read.

Better Navigation

slider-next-article-1.1

When you have an article open, the slider article card includes left / right navigation buttons that make it simple for you to quickly page through unread content using your mouse. As always, you can use the ‘j’ and ‘k’ keyboard shortcuts to navigate through articles, as well.

Faster Sharing

slider-sharing-1.1

The slider makes it even easier to share your favorite content, because sharing buttons are always kept visible while reading, especially when scrolling down long articles.

Better Discovery

slider-feed-preview-1.1

When discovering new sources on feedly, the new format makes it much easier for you to check out a source and read a few articles without losing your place in the search results.

We’d love to hear what you think of the new slider view in the comments below.

Try the new feedly slider

Some quick bug fixes [Update on Friday]

A big thank you to all the users who provided us feedback and bug reports during the last 12 hours. We just pushed out a new version which fixes the following issues:

  • o/x keyboard shortcuts will close the slider if it is open
  • n/p keyboard shortcuts will close the slider and bring the focus back to the main list
  • Fixed bug in which grandfathered users were asked to upgrade to Pro to access Buffer or Pocket
  • Fixed preview issue in Firefox 31
  • Fixed “card view has only 2 columns on Chrome Safari and Firefox beta” bug
  • Spacebar allows you to navigate vertically in the slider

We are going to continue to listen and look out for bugs and suggestions on how to improve the slider so that it works for more workflows and more screen sizes. Thanks for the great feedback!

More bug fixes and enhancements [23.1 / Monday night]

We crunched through a lot of awesome feedback over the week. We are releasing 23.1 today to fix more bugs and integrate some of the best suggestions. Here is the change log for 23.1:

  • Better centering on wide screens
  • Added previous and next arrows to the home section
  • Keyboard navigation in the slider using arrow keys
  • Fixed bug in email option
  • Do not include the sharebar if there are no shortcuts defined
  • Re-enabled sharebar at the top and at the bottom of the full article view when the slider is not used
  • Hide article link closes the slider
  • Fixed Safari 5 bug
  • Fixed “more sources” bug
  • Fixed “card view has only 2 columns in Chrome canary”
  • Fixed “sharebar floating over content” bug

Please clear your cache and reload feedly.com to make sure that you are running the latest 23.1.825 update. You can see your version information at http://feedly.com/#console

We are going to continue to listen and improve the slider experience so if you have suggestions or run into bugs, please continue to be vocal.

Frequently Asked Question

I don’t like this new format. Can I keep the old one?

There is a new Slider knob in the Preferences which allows you to limit the use of the slider to the Card view only (roughly the same behavior we had in v22).

Screenshot 2014-08-22 00.44.38

I’m still seeing the old article view, what’s going on?

First clear your cache and refresh the browser to make sure that you are running the latest version of feedly.

By default, you’ll see the new slider view on the ‘Magazine’ and ‘Cards’ layouts, but not the ‘Title Only’ layout. Visit your feedly Preferences to select the layouts you want to use the slider view. The ‘Full Article’ layout will function as it always has.

Can I customize the share and save options that appear on the top of each article? I don’t want to have to use the dropdown menu to share to my favorite site.

Yes. In the “Sharing Shortcuts” section of your feedly Preferences, you can select up to 6 sharing or saving services to show directly on the article toolbar.

In one of the screenshots, I see multiple tabs, how is that possible?

If you go to the “Add Content” section of your feedly and start exploring for new content, try choosing a site. That source’s page will open in the slider. If you then choose an article, this pattern results in the creation of multiple tabs. (You can also do this in reverse, by picking an article and then clicking the source link near the top.) The goal is to allow users to drill down, while staying in the same context and not get lost while navigating between pages.

Try the new feedly slider

Introducing slider: A new way to read on feedly [Updated]

Our goal at feedly is to connect readers to the sources of information they love and deliver the best possible reading experience. Based on feedback from many of our readers, we’re launching a new way to read articles in feedly we call the slider view. Here’s how it works and why we’re sure you’ll love it:

The Slider

slider-1.2

When you click on an article in feedly, that content will now appear in a card that slides open from the right edge of your screen.

Easier Reading

slider-close-1.1

While reading, this makes it super easy to jump back and forth between your list of unread articles and the content you want to read.

Better Navigation

slider-next-article-1.1

When you have an article open, the slider article card includes left / right navigation buttons that make it simple for you to quickly page through unread content using your mouse. As always, you can use the ‘j’ and ‘k’ keyboard shortcuts to navigate through articles, as well.

Faster Sharing

slider-sharing-1.1

The slider makes it even easier to share your favorite content, because sharing buttons are always kept visible while reading, especially when scrolling down long articles.

Better Discovery

slider-feed-preview-1.1

When discovering new sources on feedly, the new format makes it much easier for you to check out a source and read a few articles without losing your place in the search results.

We’d love to hear what you think of the new slider view in the comments below.

Try the new feedly slider

Some quick bug fixes [Update on Friday]

A big thank you to all the users who provided us feedback and bug reports during the last 12 hours. We just pushed out a new version which fixes the following issues:

  • o/x keyboard shortcuts will close the slider if it is open
  • n/p keyboard shortcuts will close the slider and bring the focus back to the main list
  • Fixed bug in which grandfathered users were asked to upgrade to Pro to access Buffer or Pocket
  • Fixed preview issue in Firefox 31
  • Fixed “card view has only 2 columns on Chrome Safari and Firefox beta” bug
  • Spacebar allows you to navigate vertically in the slider

We are going to continue to listen and look out for bugs and suggestions on how to improve the slider so that it works for more workflows and more screen sizes. Thanks for the great feedback!

More bug fixes and enhancements [23.1 / Monday night]

We crunched through a lot of awesome feedback over the week. We are releasing 23.1 today to fix more bugs and integrate some of the best suggestions. Here is the change log for 23.1:

  • Better centering on wide screens
  • Added previous and next arrows to the home section
  • Keyboard navigation in the slider using arrow keys
  • Fixed bug in email option
  • Do not include the sharebar if there are no shortcuts defined
  • Re-enabled sharebar at the top and at the bottom of the full article view when the slider is not used
  • Hide article link closes the slider
  • Fixed Safari 5 bug
  • Fixed “more sources” bug
  • Fixed “card view has only 2 columns in Chrome canary”
  • Fixed “sharebar floating over content” bug

Please clear your cache and reload feedly.com to make sure that you are running the latest 23.1.825 update. You can see your version information at http://feedly.com/#console

We are going to continue to listen and improve the slider experience so if you have suggestions or run into bugs, please continue to be vocal.

Frequently Asked Question

I don’t like this new format. Can I keep the old one?

There is a new Slider knob in the Preferences which allows you to limit the use of the slider to the Card view only (roughly the same behavior we had in v22).

Screenshot 2014-08-22 00.44.38

I’m still seeing the old article view, what’s going on?

First clear your cache and refresh the browser to make sure that you are running the latest version of feedly.

By default, you’ll see the new slider view on the ‘Magazine’ and ‘Cards’ layouts, but not the ‘Title Only’ layout. Visit your feedly Preferences to select the layouts you want to use the slider view. The ‘Full Article’ layout will function as it always has.

Can I customize the share and save options that appear on the top of each article? I don’t want to have to use the dropdown menu to share to my favorite site.

Yes. In the “Sharing Shortcuts” section of your feedly Preferences, you can select up to 6 sharing or saving services to show directly on the article toolbar.

In one of the screenshots, I see multiple tabs, how is that possible?

If you go to the “Add Content” section of your feedly and start exploring for new content, try choosing a site. That source’s page will open in the slider. If you then choose an article, this pattern results in the creation of multiple tabs. (You can also do this in reverse, by picking an article and then clicking the source link near the top.) The goal is to allow users to drill down, while staying in the same context and not get lost while navigating between pages.

Try the new feedly slider

Feedly + OneNote helps you better organize your world

We’re happy to announce that today we are adding Microsoft OneNote to the growing list of services that are integrated directly within feedly. OneNote is a cross-platform, cross-device application that enables you to capture, store and share all your ideas, thoughts and information in one place.

Feedly and OneNote share the goal of helping you work smarter, better and more efficiently. That’s why we’re so excited about the integration of our two services. We’ve added a button to feedly that lets you save stories that matter to you directly to your OneNote account with one click. Once a story is added to OneNote, you’ll be able to categorize it, edit it, annotate it, collaborate with others and access it from anywhere.

Here’s how it works.

First, find a story you want to save. Then, click the OneNote icon (OneNote icon). The first time you save to OneNote, you’ll be prompted to sign into your Microsoft account or create one. Once you’ve been authenticated, your content will be saved directly to your OneNote. Easy!

Saving to OneNote in feedly.

Feedly is a single place to discover and connect with everything you want to read, OneNote is a place to organize what you find.

Save to OneNote will be a feedly Pro feature, but from now until April 17, Microsoft has graciously agreed to sponsor the feature on feedly — which means it will be free for everyone for the next month!
Learn how you can do more with feedly and OneNote together.

FAQ

What is Microsoft OneNote?
OneNote is a free application from Microsoft that enables you to create, organize and share notes. Your notes can include text, to-do lists, images, attached files and audio recordings. You can access your notes from anywhere, and share them with family, friends, classmates and coworkers.

Where can I get OneNote?
If you have Microsoft Office, chances are you already have OneNote, and it comes pre-installed on Windows Phone. You can also download OneNote for free for Windows, Mac OS X, iPad, iPhone and Android, or you can use OneNote on the web.

How do I sign up for OneNote?
You need a free Microsoft account to access OneNote using any of the apps mentioned above. If you don’t already have one, you can sign up for an account here: https://signup.live.com/

How do I sign up for feedly?
When you visit feedly.com for the first time, you’ll be prompted to choose a few content sources to follow. When you find something you want to read, click the “Subscribe” button. Feedly will then give you the option of signing up with your Microsoft, Google, Facebook or Twitter account.

Okay, I found something I want to save to OneNote, how do I do that?
Great! Just click the OneNote icon (OneNote icon) at the top of the article you want to save (it’s right below the headline). If you’re already signed into OneNote, the article will automatically be saved to your “Quick Notes” notebook. You can then move it to another notebook, edit, annotate or share. If you’re not logged into OneNote, feedly will ask you to sign into your Microsoft account.

Will it work on mobile?
Yes! The save to OneNote feature can be accessed from any of feedly’s mobile apps. Once an article is saved to your OneNote notebook you can access it from anywhere you use OneNote.

How much does it cost?
Save to OneNote will be a feedly Pro feature. Feedly Pro supercharges your feedly experience with more powerful search options, faster update speeds and integrations with other web apps you already use. A subscription to Pro costs $5/month or $45/year, however, Microsoft will be sponsoring the OneNote feature until April 17, which means it will be available for free to all feedly users during that time!

Want to see feedly innovate faster? Become a feedly backer

Related:
Microsoft’s free OneNote vaults to top of Mac App Store chart

Feedly + OneNote helps you better organize your world

We’re happy to announce that today we are adding Microsoft OneNote to the growing list of services that are integrated directly within feedly. OneNote is a cross-platform, cross-device application that enables you to capture, store and share all your ideas, thoughts and information in one place.

Feedly and OneNote share the goal of helping you work smarter, better and more efficiently. That’s why we’re so excited about the integration of our two services. We’ve added a button to feedly that lets you save stories that matter to you directly to your OneNote account with one click. Once a story is added to OneNote, you’ll be able to categorize it, edit it, annotate it, collaborate with others and access it from anywhere.

Here’s how it works.

First, find a story you want to save. Then, click the OneNote icon (OneNote icon). The first time you save to OneNote, you’ll be prompted to sign into your Microsoft account or create one. Once you’ve been authenticated, your content will be saved directly to your OneNote. Easy!

Saving to OneNote in feedly.

Feedly is a single place to discover and connect with everything you want to read, OneNote is a place to organize what you find.

Save to OneNote will be a feedly Pro feature, but from now until April 17, Microsoft has graciously agreed to sponsor the feature on feedly — which means it will be free for everyone for the next month!
Learn how you can do more with feedly and OneNote together.

FAQ

What is Microsoft OneNote?
OneNote is a free application from Microsoft that enables you to create, organize and share notes. Your notes can include text, to-do lists, images, attached files and audio recordings. You can access your notes from anywhere, and share them with family, friends, classmates and coworkers.

Where can I get OneNote?
If you have Microsoft Office, chances are you already have OneNote, and it comes pre-installed on Windows Phone. You can also download OneNote for free for Windows, Mac OS X, iPad, iPhone and Android, or you can use OneNote on the web.

How do I sign up for OneNote?
You need a free Microsoft account to access OneNote using any of the apps mentioned above. If you don’t already have one, you can sign up for an account here: https://signup.live.com/

How do I sign up for feedly?
When you visit feedly.com for the first time, you’ll be prompted to choose a few content sources to follow. When you find something you want to read, click the “Subscribe” button. Feedly will then give you the option of signing up with your Microsoft, Google, Facebook or Twitter account.

Okay, I found something I want to save to OneNote, how do I do that?
Great! Just click the OneNote icon (OneNote icon) at the top of the article you want to save (it’s right below the headline). If you’re already signed into OneNote, the article will automatically be saved to your “Quick Notes” notebook. You can then move it to another notebook, edit, annotate or share. If you’re not logged into OneNote, feedly will ask you to sign into your Microsoft account.

Will it work on mobile?
Yes! The save to OneNote feature can be accessed from any of feedly’s mobile apps. Once an article is saved to your OneNote notebook you can access it from anywhere you use OneNote.

How much does it cost?
Save to OneNote will be a feedly Pro feature. Feedly Pro supercharges your feedly experience with more powerful search options, faster update speeds and integrations with other web apps you already use. A subscription to Pro costs $5/month or $45/year, however, Microsoft will be sponsoring the OneNote feature until April 17, which means it will be available for free to all feedly users during that time!

Want to see feedly innovate faster? Become a feedly backer

Related:
Microsoft’s free OneNote vaults to top of Mac App Store chart

What’s new in Feedly 18 for Android?

We just released the new version of feedly for Android to the Google Play Store.

As mentioned in the beta announcement, the main feature of this release is speed reading – a new tap gesture which allows power readers to quickly jump from one inlined article to the next:

Speed Reading

Here is a summary of the other features and bug fixes we are releasing as part of the this request:

1) We redesigned the user experience on the Nexus 7 – focusing on speed and efficiency.

2) We fixed the back button bug reported by many users – where the app would sometimes require multiple back taps to exit.

3) We addressed the rendering bug reported by many Android 4.1 users. This was due to an optimization we put in place for Kitkat but did not play nice with Android 4.1. If you are a feedly + android 4.1 user, you should see fewer rendering issues.

4) We enhanced the login. We now offer a full Google+ login option (the red ‘Login with Google’ button) as well as the old Google OAuth button. The Google+ option comes with a safer Single Sign On implementation and a better sharing dialog. Your choice.

5) Fixed the login expiration bug.

6) Improved the speed of the image processing service. This was one of the key requirements to delivering the speed reading feature.

7) Added a new Mark All As Read card which includes some status about your reading session. More on this later this year.

8) Compatibility with the Samsung Galaxy Gear. More on this next week.

9) Removed the colors in the left selector. This is because we will soon allow users to assign colors to categories, making colors functional.

10) New enhanced black/night theme.

What are the next features we are exploring for feedly mobile 19?
+ Tagging
+ Evernote integration (pro)
+ Customizable font and font size
+ Ability to associate a color to each collections
+ Better search
+ Smooth scrolling for the title only view
+ Offline support for home, must reads and saved items
+ Notification support for must reads

If you want to participate to the creation of the feedly roadmap, join the feedly beta community.

/Edwin

New Feedly for Android – Version 17 is out.

We just pushed a new version of feedly for Android to the Google Play Store (version 17.0). You can update it on your device or download it from:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.devhd.feedly

widget-hero-video

Here is the change log:

  • New version of the android widget
  • 300% faster start time
  • More fluid scrolling experience
  • Better fonts and visual design
  • Search in my feedly (pro)
  • New discover section
  • Enhanced feed search
  • No auto-refresh on restart
  • New Facebook SDK integration
  • Dashclock support
  • Support for Samsung Gear

Special thanks to the Google Android and Google Chrome teams for their coaching.

Version 17 will be submitted to Apple for review on Friday and should be available in the app store shortly after.

If you run into a bug, please leave a comment and we will pass the feedback to the dev team.

Update (Wednesday morning): Some of the optimizations we performed for Android 4.1 and 4.3 seem to cause some issues on Android 2.x and 4.0. The dev team is looking this. We aim to have a fix out by Monday.

Update (Wednesday night): Pushed a 17.1 patch out. Fixed a GPU rendering issue for Android 3.0 and Android 4.0.4 users.

feedly mobile 14.1 is out: New Title-only View

Thank you to Apple for approving feedly for iOS 14.1. This release focuses on a better list view and fixing a few critical bugs around authentication and loading. It is a step forward towards making feedly a better home for Google Reader users looking for a new reader.

Feedly for 14.1 is available now in the app store and continues to be free:
Get feedly 14.1 for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch
Get feedly 14.1 for Android

New title view

Here is the detailed change log:
☂ Users do not need to login over and over again.
★ Denser and cleaner title-only view.
★ Brought back the old list view.
★ Better support for Hebrew and Farsi.
☂ Titles are no longer cut off in the title only view on iPhone 4
☂ Better support for flaky network connections.
☂ Lots of small bug fixes.

feedly mobile 14.1 is out: New Title-only View

Thank you to Apple for approving feedly for iOS 14.1. This release focuses on a better list view and fixing a few critical bugs around authentication and loading. It is a step forward towards making feedly a better home for Google Reader users looking for a new reader.

Feedly for 14.1 is available now in the app store and continues to be free:
Get feedly 14.1 for iPhone, iPad and iPod touch
Get feedly 14.1 for Android

New title view

Here is the detailed change log:
☂ Users do not need to login over and over again.
★ Denser and cleaner title-only view.
★ Brought back the old list view.
★ Better support for Hebrew and Farsi.
☂ Titles are no longer cut off in the title only view on iPhone 4
☂ Better support for flaky network connections.
☂ Lots of small bug fixes.

14.0.477 – An update of feedly desktop focused on performance and quality

Our current focus is quality and keeping the service up. We are pushing out today a new release of feedly for Chrome/Safari/Firefox which addresses some of the most pressing issues reported by the community.

Download the latest version

feedly for Firefox (requires manual update)
feedly for Safari (requires manual update)
feedly for Chrome (auto-updates)

Screen Shot 2013-04-08 at 2.48.13 AM

Change Log

Issue #1: “Re-login”. The session management has been improved so that users do not have to continuously re-login, even when the server is under very high load.

Issue #2: Full width. To make reading in title only mode more efficient, we now stretch the content of the list to take advantage of the full width of the window.

Issue #3: Support for Hebrew and Farsi. Feedly knows now how to render right to left languages like Hebrew, Farsi and Arabic.

Issue #4: Faster load time. We optimized some of the client code to make loading feedly faster. We are also adding hardware as fast as we can.

Issue #5: Support for folders including [ ]. The previous version was not able to load categories with brackets in their name. This issue has been fixed.

Issue #6: Better feed search. It should be easier now to find a feed by URL and add it to your feedly.

Issue #7: More sharing options in the title only view. We added shortcuts in the list view to easily share articles to twitter, Facebook, linked in and Buffer.

Screen Shot 2013-04-08 at 2.49.02 AM

14.0.477 – An update of feedly desktop focused on performance and quality

Our current focus is quality and keeping the service up. We are pushing out today a new release of feedly for Chrome/Safari/Firefox which addresses some of the most pressing issues reported by the community.

Download the latest version

feedly for Firefox (requires manual update)
feedly for Safari (requires manual update)
feedly for Chrome (auto-updates)

Screen Shot 2013-04-08 at 2.48.13 AM

Change Log

Issue #1: “Re-login”. The session management has been improved so that users do not have to continuously re-login, even when the server is under very high load.

Issue #2: Full width. To make reading in title only mode more efficient, we now stretch the content of the list to take advantage of the full width of the window.

Issue #3: Support for Hebrew and Farsi. Feedly knows now how to render right to left languages like Hebrew, Farsi and Arabic.

Issue #4: Faster load time. We optimized some of the client code to make loading feedly faster. We are also adding hardware as fast as we can.

Issue #5: Support for folders including [ ]. The previous version was not able to load categories with brackets in their name. This issue has been fixed.

Issue #6: Better feed search. It should be easier now to find a feed by URL and add it to your feedly.

Issue #7: More sharing options in the title only view. We added shortcuts in the list view to easily share articles to twitter, Facebook, linked in and Buffer.

Screen Shot 2013-04-08 at 2.49.02 AM

Announcing the New Feedly Mobile

Today, we are very excited to announce a brand new version of Feedly Mobile, centered around search and discovery, productive reading and better sharing.

It is available now on:
iPhone
iPad
iPod touch
Android Phone
Android Tablet
Firefox
Chrome
Safari

We’ve had two crazy, wonderful weeks at Feedly. Over 3 million new users have joined Feedly since the announcement of the retirement of Google Reader. We are thankful that so many Reader refugees have chosen Feedly for their new home, and are adding hardware as quickly as we can to make that transition as seamless as possible.

feedy

All-new search and discovery engine

Introducing a completely new way to search and discover feeds. Our new feed search engine is amazingly fast, and brings over 50 million feeds to your fingertips. No other news reader comes even close to offering this breadth of choice.

The smart topic completion feature enables a truly intuitive search and discovery experience. The new search algorithm leverages millions of interactions from the Feedly community, helping you find the best feeds on the web. There are already millions of people using Feedly, and more and more joining every day. The more you use Feedly to search, categorize and follow your favorite feeds, the better our search and discovery will become.

Feedly New Search

Productive reading

To make sure you never miss updates from your most important feeds, we have added a feature called “Must Reads”. New posts from the feeds that you promote as “must read”, will bubble up to the top of the feed selection panel and in the “Today” section.

We have also added a pull to refresh gesture to the feed selection panel so that you can always easily get to the latest content available.

Finally, we added a new title only view to make scanning of headlines more efficient.

Productive Reading

Fast and easy sharing

The redesigned sharing panel makes sharing and saving articles to read later, easier than ever. We have added support for Google+, and settings that let you select which saving and sharing option should have a shortcut on your main toolbar. Google+, Pocket and Buffer users will appreciate the direct access to their favorite tools.

Sharing

We would like to thank all the users who have provided invaluable feedback through the UserVoice support forum. We would also like to thank the 500+ people who have participated in the Android private beta over the last 10 weeks. Their feedback and bug reports were key in helping us to get to the release finish line. Last but not least, we would like to thank Anthony Casalena, Founder and CEO of Squarespace, for providing us with such great insight over the last three months on how to make Feedly a better reader. His feedback was the inspiration for a lot of the productivity features we are delivering in this update.

The feedback we collected during the private beta was the best we have received since the first release of Feedly Mobile and we can’t wait to see how this update resonates with the rest of the community.

Please let us know what you think!

All the best,

Your Feedly Team

Announcing the New Feedly Mobile

Today, we are very excited to announce a brand new version of Feedly Mobile, centered around search and discovery, productive reading and better sharing.

It is available now on:
iPhone
iPad
iPod touch
Android Phone
Android Tablet
Firefox
Chrome
Safari

We’ve had two crazy, wonderful weeks at Feedly. Over 3 million new users have joined Feedly since the announcement of the retirement of Google Reader. We are thankful that so many Reader refugees have chosen Feedly for their new home, and are adding hardware as quickly as we can to make that transition as seamless as possible.

feedy

All-new search and discovery engine

Introducing a completely new way to search and discover feeds. Our new feed search engine is amazingly fast, and brings over 50 million feeds to your fingertips. No other news reader comes even close to offering this breadth of choice.

The smart topic completion feature enables a truly intuitive search and discovery experience. The new search algorithm leverages millions of interactions from the Feedly community, helping you find the best feeds on the web. There are already millions of people using Feedly, and more and more joining every day. The more you use Feedly to search, categorize and follow your favorite feeds, the better our search and discovery will become.

Feedly New Search

Productive reading

To make sure you never miss updates from your most important feeds, we have added a feature called “Must Reads”. New posts from the feeds that you promote as “must read”, will bubble up to the top of the feed selection panel and in the “Today” section.

We have also added a pull to refresh gesture to the feed selection panel so that you can always easily get to the latest content available.

Finally, we added a new title only view to make scanning of headlines more efficient.

Productive Reading

Fast and easy sharing

The redesigned sharing panel makes sharing and saving articles to read later, easier than ever. We have added support for Google+, and settings that let you select which saving and sharing option should have a shortcut on your main toolbar. Google+, Pocket and Buffer users will appreciate the direct access to their favorite tools.

Sharing

We would like to thank all the users who have provided invaluable feedback through the UserVoice support forum. We would also like to thank the 500+ people who have participated in the Android private beta over the last 10 weeks. Their feedback and bug reports were key in helping us to get to the release finish line. Last but not least, we would like to thank Anthony Casalena, Founder and CEO of Squarespace, for providing us with such great insight over the last three months on how to make Feedly a better reader. His feedback was the inspiration for a lot of the productivity features we are delivering in this update.

The feedback we collected during the private beta was the best we have received since the first release of Feedly Mobile and we can’t wait to see how this update resonates with the rest of the community.

Please let us know what you think!

All the best,

Your Feedly Team

10 new features for a smoother transition

We just released a new update of feedly for Chrome, Firefox and Safari with 10 new features. If you are using feedly on Firefox and Safari, please do a manual upgrade.

Change summary

★ Firefox upgrade from old v10 codebase to latest v14 codebase.
★ A new left selector design. Less loud – more more all caps.
★ Better read/unread contrast
★ Sort alphabetically
★ Denser, cleaner list view
★ n/p keyboard shortcuts.
★ Fast view switching
★ Faster saving.
★ Better LinkedIn integration.
★ Better recommendations.
☂ Memory optimization

Install the latest version now:

Feedly for Firefox
Feedly for Chrome
Feedly for Safari
Feedly mobile

Detailed information

Feature #1. Upgrading feedly firefox from the old v10 code base to the latest v14 codebase. Firefox users will be able to benefit from a lot of the enhancements we implemented over the last 12 months on Chrome. Going forward, we are going to release Firefox, Chrome and Safari all at the same time.

Feature #2. A new left selector design. Less loud – no more all caps. Better contrast between read and unread. New selector Feature #3. Sort alphabetically. More control over how feeds and categories are sorted on the left selector. Either drag and drop and easily re-sort alphabetically.

Feature #4. fast view switching. One of the key features of feedly is that you can easily adapt the format/layout of your feeds to different workflows. We bubbled up that feature in the UI to make easy to try different views and see which one is right for you.

Feature #5. faster saving. We improved the experience for users whose workflow is to quickly scan list views and save for later (aka star in Google Reader).

Feature #6. Denser, cleaner list view. Making the transition from the Google Reader list view to the feedly list view as seamless as possible. New list view Feature #7. n/p keyboard shortcuts. We improved support for the n(ext)/p(revious) keyboard shortcuts. Type ? in feedly to see the list of other keyboard shortcuts we support.

Feature #8. Better recommendations. We improved the feedly curation algorithm used to select the articles which are featured at the top of each page.

Feature #9. better LinkedIn integration. Special thanks to the buffer team for sprinting with us to make the feedly LinkedIn integration as seamless as possible.

LinkedIn

Feature #10. Memory optimization. No more memory leaks. No more refreshes while you are reading articles.

Thanks again for all the feedback. Please continue to be vocal and help us spread the word.

Feedly for Chrome 14.0.466 is out

We just pushed out a new version of feedly for chrome. It impacts both the feedly and the feedly plus flavors.

Here is a quick overview of the change log:

Change #1: We fixed a series of session related bugs. As a result, you should start seeing fewer offline messages.

Change #2: We renamed Today. The new name is Highlights. This is to re-enforce that that section is a subset of the articles published on your feedly. The content has not changed yet, but it will. Arthur is doing some usability research to understand how people use that section and how we can simplify it while making it more useful. More soon.

Change #3: We renamed Latest. The new name is All. This is part of a bigger goal of better supporting people who read everything in their feedly and for whom All, unread counts, marking things as read and saving things for later is very important. Here again, Arthur is doing some UX research which will help us streamline some of the workflows power readers have put in place.

Our focus for the first part of this year is to improve the quality and performance of feedly across the board. This is a first step towards that direction. Please let us know if you have questions/suggestions.

Feedly for Chrome 14.0.466 is out

We just pushed out a new version of feedly for chrome. It impacts both the feedly and the feedly plus flavors.

Here is a quick overview of the change log:

Change #1: We fixed a series of session related bugs. As a result, you should start seeing fewer offline messages.

Change #2: We renamed Today. The new name is Highlights. This is to re-enforce that that section is a subset of the articles published on your feedly. The content has not changed yet, but it will. Arthur is doing some usability research to understand how people use that section and how we can simplify it while making it more useful. More soon.

Change #3: We renamed Latest. The new name is All. This is part of a bigger goal of better supporting people who read everything in their feedly and for whom All, unread counts, marking things as read and saving things for later is very important. Here again, Arthur is doing some UX research which will help us streamline some of the workflows power readers have put in place.

Our focus for the first part of this year is to improve the quality and performance of feedly across the board. This is a first step towards that direction. Please let us know if you have questions/suggestions.